Robots at UCLA RoMeLa

 

 

Some points I liked:

Around 21:00-22:00 “Sometimes we have a specific application in mind…
Sometimes you randomly have an interesting idea that has no purpose and no application… Then these ideas which had no values find an application.”

My comment: This is exactly what Mathematical research is about. You prove a theorem that has no application. Then you find an application.

Around 26:50 We have so many ideas that do not work.

and

Around 27:40 Failure is not necessarily a bad thing. If we can avoid failure, we do…
We have ten times more failures and all these failures gave us the chance to learn about things, and this lead to our successes.

My comment: This is exactly the same in Mathematical research too. Most ideas do not work, but you learn from them and modify them to work.

Around 29:40 Many times (the students) do not get to build the robots, but they do the Math!

 

 

 

 

 

Around 21:00-22:00 Sometimes we have a specific application in mind…
Sometimes you randomly have an interesting idea that has no purpose and no application…
Then these ideas which had no values find an application.

Around 26:50 We have so many ideas that do not work.

Around 27:40 Failure is not necessarily a bad thing. If we can avoid failur, we do…
We have ten times more failures and all these failures gave us the chance to learn about things, and this lead to our successes.

Around 29:40 Many times (the students) do not get to build the robots, but they do the Math!

 

 

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Mathematicians Who Died Under Unfortunate or Unfitting circumstances

From http://www.kellenmyers.org/deaths.html

This page features a collection of mathematicians who died under unfortunate or unfitting circumstances.

Évariste Galois

1811-1832 (20, killed) Presumably the youngest to qualify for inclusion on this list, Galois died at a meagre 20 years. He was shot in the stomach, and a full day later died, in hospital. The circumstances surrounding his death are not entirely known, only that he was killed in a duel. Speculation tends to indicate that the duel was motivated either by a matter related to his involvement with the radical Républicain movement, or by conflict arising from a romantic entanglement. The duel occurred only a month after his release from a six-month incarceration stemming from his disrutpive political activities. Having predicted defeat, Galois jotted down what would become his mathematical legacy, on the eve of the duel. Sadly, his last words were: “Ne pleure pas, Alfred! J’ai besoin de tout mon courage pour mourir à vingt ans!”

ERC: Meet Poppy!

From http://erc.europa.eu/sites/default/files/press_release/files/ERC_highlight_Poppy.pdf

Highlight:Meet Poppy,the 3-D printed robot set to inspire innovation in classrooms
28October2014
Written in cooperation with Inria, France
European Research Council (ERC) grantee Dr Pierre-Yves Oudeyer, is today presenting the first complete open-source 3D printed humanoid robot, called “Poppy” (@poppy_project). Poppy is a robot that anybody can build– its body is 3D printed and its behaviour programmed by the user. However, it is not just a tool for scientists and computer “geeks”– the team of developers aims to use the robot as part of vocational training in schools, giving students the opportunity to experiment and program 3D printed robots with various characteristics.